Book Image

Solutions Architect’s Handbook - Second Edition

By : Saurabh Shrivastava, Neelanjali Srivastav
4 (2)
Book Image

Solutions Architect’s Handbook - Second Edition

4 (2)
By: Saurabh Shrivastava, Neelanjali Srivastav

Overview of this book

Becoming a solutions architect requires a hands-on approach, and this edition of the Solutions Architect's Handbook brings exactly that. This handbook will teach you how to create robust, scalable, and fault-tolerant solutions and next-generation architecture designs in a cloud environment. It will also help you build effective product strategies for your business and implement them from start to finish. This new edition features additional chapters on disruptive technologies, such as Internet of Things (IoT), quantum computing, data engineering, and machine learning. It also includes updated discussions on cloud-native architecture, blockchain data storage, and mainframe modernization with public cloud. The Solutions Architect's Handbook provides an understanding of solution architecture and how it fits into an agile enterprise environment. It will take you through the journey of solution architecture design by providing detailed knowledge of design pillars, advanced design patterns, anti-patterns, and the cloud-native aspects of modern software design. By the end of this handbook, you'll have learned the techniques needed to create efficient architecture designs that meet your business requirements.
Table of Contents (22 chapters)
20
Other Books You May Enjoy
21
Index

Quantum computing in real life

Quantum computers are collections of specialized quantum systems that can be systematically controlled over a period of time to perform a desired task. QC is not a replacement for current computers and may not solve problems where you don't need complex calculations. As an analogy, you can see light bulbs versus candlelight as equivalent to QC versus current computers. It doesn't matter how much advancement you put into candles; you cannot convert candles into light bulbs—they are entirely different technologies.

Let's take an example of choosing the seating arrangements for 15 people. At first glance, it may look straightforward, but if you calculate, there are more than 1.3 trillion (factorial of 15) possible ways to seat just 15 people. Imagine if you needed to solve this problem for 100 people: you would run out of memory and compute. Classical supercomputers don't have the working memory to hold the countless combinations...